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INSIGHTS ON IVOR   Part Thirty Two        Getting through the months following my mother’s death were helped in no small measure by the support given, once again, by my father’s two sisters Lily and Kate. In addition to Auntie Lily being a member of the St.John Ambulance Brigade she also loving cooking so Dad and I had no worries on that score. I remember doing the shopping for Auntie Lily and when she wanted me to get some lamb at the butchers she always insisted I must ask for ‘Half a shoulder of lamb, blade end’. In...

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                                          INSIGHTS ON IVOR                                            Part Thirty-One     Tragedy struck our family in January 1956 when my mother suffered a recurrence of her cancer: first diagnosed in 1947. Once again my father’s two sisters moved in with us to help nurse her but it was to no avail and Mum was again admitted to hospital. After more diagnosis, we were given the...

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To add to the new phenomenon of Skiffle hitting Britain another craze was to follow with the advent of ‘Teddy Boys’. Originating from the 1940’s this was the name given to teenage boys who wore a mode of clothes as worn during the ‘Edwardian’ period. This sartorial style consisted of long drape jackets with a velvet collar, thin (drainpipe) trousers, varying colours of shirt which was topped off with a bootlace tie. Often their feet would have brightly coloured socks which were then encased in suede (usually coloured blue) shoes bearing very thick crepe soles. This type of footwear quickly...

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INSIGHTS ON IVOR   Part Twenty Nine       It probably comes as no surprise to you that because of my varied musical tastes when Skiffle arrived I was also caught up in it and joined the craze by buying my first guitar. This came about through another friend of Brother Bernard’s, Dickie Bishop, who played banjo occasionally with the Barber band, and guitar with Lonnie Donegan.  Dickie had decided to change his guitar for another model and asked me if I’d like to buy his old model. As it was a Gibson, a make highly regarded as one of...

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Part Twenty Eight    British Cornet player Ken Colyer was once a Merchant Seaman and was fortunate enough on one trip to visit New Orleans. When he subsequently formed his own band, the Ken Colyer Jazzmen in and around 1953/1954 he just had to pay due homage to the home of Trad Jazz by recording an LP (Long Playing) record called ‘New Orleans to London’ The cover was designed by his clarinettist, Monty Sunshine. Other members of the band included Chris Barber on Trombone and a young banjo player named Anthony Donegan. The opening track on this record was appropriately called ‘Going Home’...

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